All posts filed under: Exhibitions

Don’t miss Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

The highly anticipated exhibition, Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion, is now open at the V&A Museum. It celebrates a hundred years since the opening of the brand’s first ever fashion house as well as its lasting influence on today’s style. The presentation is divided by three themes; front of house, workrooms and legacy. On display are a mixture of apparel, sketches, photography and videos. There are also x-rays which interestingly illustrate the internal compositions of what was once considered radical clothing given their avant-garde construction – The sack dress, tunic, baby doll dress and shift dress all have Cristóbal Balenciaga at their origin. The brand’s founder was experimental. He was known for playing with proportion and volume, often creating new shapes which de-emphasised the waist in contrast to the traditional hourglass silhouette that had historically dominated a woman’s wardrobe. His innovative approach to fashion earned him great respect and admiration from his peers. Coco Chanel described Balenciaga as the “Master of haute couture”. Hubert de Givenchy praisingly said, “I don’t think even the Bible has taught me as …

From selfie to self-expression

In September 2015, Dolce and Gabbana became the first major fashion house to incorporate the selfie into the runway. Their Italian village-inspired collection at Milan’s Fashion week was filled with floral prints, harvest-themed colours, ceramic patterns, and postcard imagery of landmarks and landscapes, featuring the mobile phone. Several, in fact. As each model strutted down the runway, they would take a selfie. Their photographs were then instantaneously projected onto large screens around the venue and uploaded to the brand’s social media channels. The result was an unprecedented amount of audience participation and interaction through likes, comments and shares, attracting huge press coverage and sales. A year prior, a lesser-known Kenneth Cole had used Instagram and Vine for his spring collection, ‘Content creators’. A playful then 21-year old, Cara Delevingne, had also live-streamed herself as she pouted and pulled funny faces marching down the catwalk at the Giles Deacon show. Once shy of engaging the market through digital means, luxury fashion was starting to understand and embrace the penchant of the new era to capture and …

The Met Ball: The first Monday in May

The first Monday in May sets the date for the annual Costume Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, commonly shortened to The Met Ball or Met Gala. It is also the name of an intimate and insightful film that closely follows curator, Andrew Bolton, from initial conception to the development and execution of the 2015 Met Ball themed ‘China: Through the looking glass’. The gala has become an extremely coveted event. Since the arrival of Anna Wintour, American Vogue Editor-in-Chief as it’s Chair, the benefit has grown immensely in scale. Attended by celebrities, designers and other household names from the fashion world, politics and business, the proceeds are often so large they finance the entire operational budget per annum for the Institute alone, raising funds in excess of tens of billions. The starting price for an individual ticket is $30,000 and a table almost 10-fold at 275K. The theme of the Met Ball rotates each year. 2017 paid tribute to Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons and the concept of ‘the art of in-between’ contrasting past …

Vogue 100: A century of style

To celebrate the 100th birthday of fashion publication, British Vogue, London’s National Portrait Gallery showcased Vogue 100: a century of style. The exhibition displayed a series of stunning covers dating back to the first ever issue from 1916. With imagery shot by top industry photographers, David Bailey, Mario Testino and Patrick Demarchelier, it paid tribute to eccentric, rebellious, British designers such as Westwood and McQueen, striking supermodels, Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell and Agyness Deyn and commemorated national treasure, late Princess Diana.