All posts filed under: Politics

Fashion and Fake News

It started with politics. It was a term coined by Donald Trump when he aggressively responded to questioning by CNN Journalist, Jim Acosta, at his premier press conference as President-elect. “You are fake news!” Similarly, this catchphrase was used to describe, retrospectively, the claim by the UK Independence Party that a vote to leave the EU would result in £350 million worth of net savings a week. As alleged, this instead could have been directed towards funding domestic institutions, such as the NHS. Bending the truth, embellishing the truth, a white lie, and lying by omission are all tactics that have long been endorsed in political warfare. They’re employed to influence the vote of the public in favour of a particular party, while damaging others. When I first learnt about such broadcasts on TV, radio and print media, in history lessons at school, we called it propaganda. But since then, the concept is no longer confined to the realms of electioneering. Fake News has become some sort of phenomenon, applicable to other areas including fashion. …

Since when did fashion get so political?

For decades, fashion journalists have been chronicling the outfits of First Ladies, Prime Minister’s wives and the royals.  They track their sartorial strategies on the global stage of international politics and diplomacy. On their visits to foreign lands, do they respect the host country’s dress customs and norms? Do they choose to wear a designer from that country? Or do they stand patriotic and wear a home-grown brand? And what does it even matter? Fashion is an extremely powerful means of non-verbal communication. World Leaders and associates can use clothing as much as speech and action to shape the public’s perception of their values, their belief system and their policies. Attire that references and celebrates in someway our identities in particular, influences our judgment of that political figure, sending us cues that subconsciously inform our opinion of what they stand for. When Melania Trump recently wore a black, lace, knee-length dress on an overseas trip to the Vatican, she showed recognition and respect for the Pope and Catholic tradition. Before the Trump election, throughout the …

I am an immigrant

I am an immigrant is a simple but touching production by W magazine in response to the popular vote of the American people to build a $12bn “impenetrable” southern-border wall along the US-Mexican frontier, a vote in support of the refugee ban to restrict inbound travel to the States from 7 predominantly Islamic countries, a vote that signals a belief in President Trump’s promises of a stronger, more prosperous economy built on anti-immigration rhetoric, echoing the outlandish claims of the Brexit campaign and giving life to the harrowing rise in popularity of France’s Le Pen. Over the last 12 months, political swings closer and closer to the extreme right, continue to send shockwaves across the globe, leaving no corner and no industry, including fashion, untouched. Led by W Magazine’s Creative and Fashion Director, later announced incoming Editor-In-Chief of British Vogue, Edward Enninful published a powerful piece of film. The video alerts us to the reality that the fashion community is made up of designers, models, photographers and other actors from all over the world. Enninful himself …

Elle Magazine: The Feminism Issue

Every now and again when I’m flicking through a fashion magazine and I come across a truly inspiring article, a quote or an image, I have to archive it. Recently, I’ve been digging around my inspo treasure trove in search of a little pick-me-up and motivation, and this Thursday I’m throwing it back to Carey Mulligan on the cover of Elle magazine: the feminism issue, November 2015 #ThrowbackThursday #TBT. In this issue, Carey describes her experience of playing Maud in the impassioned and awe-inspiring film Suffragette. Maud is a working-class mother who joins the fight for the right for women to vote (c.1905-1915) but is made to endure police brutality, imprisonment, hunger strikes, force-feeding, job loss and social exclusion from her community as a result. Similarly to her character, Carey continues to challenge the oppression and discriminatory practices against women that still exist today. By 1928, women over the age of 21 years old had achieved the same voting rights as men in the UK. However, 89 years later in 2017, women are still on the …